Intuitive Training

Someone told me the other day that this was something new. However for the last 30 odd years weight trainers/body builders have been doing intuitive training. What is it? Well while there are indeed set procedures and rules that are still true today in relation to weight training such as: set times, repetitions, sets and rest for endurance, hypertrophy, strength and power, intuitive training is more about knowing your bodies capabilities and when you can do another set, when you have had enough rest and how quick your body has restored its ATP (Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)……ATP transports chemical energy within cells for metabolism. ATP is therefore continuously recycled in organisms. The human body on average contains only about 250 grams.)

Intuitive training should in principal be taught from day (1) when you start weight training. It does take a while for someone to really get to know their own bodies but within 3 months of continuous training the young new body builder will have a better understanding of his/her body, the amount of rest they need and when to return to training. An individual will soon understand if they are tired or just being lazy. When completing intuitive training it is also important to ensure as a body builder you follow some simple rules, like getting enough sleep refueling the body with good carbohydrates so you can have plenty of ATP when exercising and repair with small amounts of lean protein, vegetables, fruit and nuts. Not burning the candle at both ends is a good start. As we age we find recover and hypertrophy becomes harder so again we may need to rest more and take longer breaks between exercises. However a body builder who hits 50 soon knows his/her limits.

Intuitive training is the corner stone of a successful training program. It’s also one of the most intricate skills to acquire. Intuitive training can be the difference between a true high intensive workout and one that is mediocre.

It will take a while to get it or FEEL IT”….. However the more you weight train and practice the more you tap into your ability to guide your training and intensity with your own intuition. With this type of training your workout becomes less about sets and reps, and more about how hard you can work in any particular session. Some days you will complete a harder than usual session and feel strong with lots of energy while other days you will simply be going through the motions. So try this approach and see how it works. By simply listening to what your body needs, working hard, resting when you are tired and resuming the next set or workout when you are ready may just work for you !!..

By
John Hart
“Master’s In Education” (Disability) Newcastle University Australia
“Grad Cert Education” Newcastle University Australia
“Diploma Fitness/Recreation”
“Cert 4 Personal Training”
“Level 1 Strength and Conditioning Coach

References:

1.      ^ Knowles JR (1980). “Enzyme-catalyzed phosphoryl transfer reactions”. Annu. Rev. Biochem. 49: 877–919. doi:10.1146/annurev.bi.49.070180.004305. PMID 6250450

2.      ^ Campbell, Neil A.; Brad Williamson; Robin J. Heyden (2006). Biology: Exploring Life. Boston, Massachusetts: Pearson Prentice Hall. ISBN 0-13-250882-6. http://www.phschool.com/el_marketing.html

3.      ^ “‘Nature’s Batteries’ May Have Helped Power Early Lifeforms”. Science Daily. May 25, 2010. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100525094906.htm. Retrieved 2010-05-26. “At any one time, the human body contains just 250g of ATP — this provides roughly the same amount of energy as a single AA battery. This ATP store is being constantly used and regenerated in cells via a process known as respiration, which is driven by natural catalysts called enzymes.” 

4.      ^ Törnroth-Horsefield S, Neutze R (December 2008). “Opening and closing the metabolite gate”. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 105 (50): 19565–6. doi:10.1073/pnas.0810654106. PMC 2604989. PMID 19073922. http://www.pnas.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=19073922

5.      ^ Hardie DG, Hawley SA (December 2001). “AMP-activated protein kinase: the energy charge hypothesis revisited”. Bioessays 23 (12): 1112–9. doi:10.1002/bies.10009. PMID 11746230.

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