IS TAKING CREATINE GOOD FOR ME?

I have been asked on many occasions to talk about supplementing a body builder’s diet with creatine. There was a rumour that France had banned this some years back as it was thought to be carcinogenic. After researching this notion I found little to no evidence that this is the case. However I am not in favour of adding supplements that our bodies naturally produce as our homeostasis has a way of stopping the body naturally producing certain things when they are taken in excess. If you have a good diet that contains lean red meat there would no need to ingest more creatine. Creatine bonds with water and gives you a feeling and look of bloat. The Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Trieste, Trieste, ITALIE had this to say in its abstract.

Abstract

Quote: This review focuses on the potential side effects caused by oral creatine supplementation on gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, renal and liver functions. No strong evidence linking creatine supplementation to deterioration of these functions has been found. In fact, most reports on side effects, such as muscle cramping, gastrointestinal symptoms, changes in renal and hepatic laboratory values, remain anecdotal because the case studies do not represent well-controlled trials, so no causal relationship between creatine supplementation and these side-effects has yet been established. The only documented side effect is an increase in body mass. Furthermore, a possibly unexpected outcome related to creatine monohydrate ingestion is the amount of contaminants present that may be generated during the industrial production. Recently, controlled studies made to integrate the existing knowledge based on anecdotal reports on the side effects of creatine have indicated that, in healthy subjects, oral supplementation with creatine, even with long-term dosage, may be considered an effective and safe ergogenic aid. However, athletes should be educated as to proper dosing or to take creatine under medical supervision” UNQUOTE

Also it should be pointed out that creatine found in food and made by our bodies is a far better way of utilizing it. Foods such as red meat, tuna, salmon, sashimi, milk and sushi contain creatine in them and the added bonus of consuming it in food is that these foods contain methionine, Omega 3, and fatty acids that actually aids the body’s natural synthesis of creatine within our diets. I see little to no benefit in taking this expensive supplement. Save your money and enjoy your steak.

By: John Hart

Master’s In Education” (Disability/Rehab) Newcastle University Australia

“Grad Cert Education” Newcastle University Australia

“Diploma Fitness/Recreation”

“Diploma of Sport and Recreation”

“Cert 4 Personal Training”

“Level 1 Strength and Conditioning Coach”

Member of ASCA (Australian Strength and Conditioning Association)

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply